1st Edition

Principles and Practice in Biobank Governance





ISBN 9781138276932
Published November 29, 2016 by Routledge
316 Pages

USD $62.95

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

Rapid technological advances, the establishment of large-scale biobanks, and the exchange of data across international boundaries raise a variety of questions for regulators struggling with the problem of how to govern such stores of information and the processes connected with them. Engaging with the pressing issues of privacy, consent, access to data, and benefit sharing, Principles and Practice in Biobank Governance draws together the latest empirical research from the UK, Europe, America, Australia and Asia to focus on these challenges. Current models of governance are critiqued, principles and policies are debated, and new models and theoretical frameworks are presented through this intellectually stimulating, informative volume. This truly international volume offers new insights from a range of disciplinary perspectives and will be essential reading for policy makers and scholars across a range of social sciences, including sociology, bioethics, law and social policy.

Author(s)

Biography

Jane Kaye is Wellcome Trust Fellow in Medical Law at the Ethox Centre, University of Oxford, UK Mark Stranger has taught sociology and worked as Senior Research Fellow and Executive Director at the Centre for Law and Genetics, University of Tasmania, Australia. He is the author of Surfing Life: Surface, Substructure and the Commodification of the Sublime.

Reviews

'From empirical data to conceptual analysis, and from assessment of public opinion to recommendations for policy, Kaye and Stranger have managed to pack a lot into this edited volume that will please researchers, policy makers and lay readers alike. It is a much needed collection that lives up to its offer to provide principles and practice for biobank governance.' Eric M. Meslin, Indiana University Center for Bioethics, USA 'The governance of biobanks is a major ethical issue of our time. This volume combines the latest empirical findings with an international blend of scientific, ethical, legal and sociological expertise, resulting in a comprehensive critique of current practice and focused suggestions for future development. Helpfully jargon-free, it should be a major resource for biobank planners, funders, administrators, users - and participants.' Alastair Campbell, National University of Singapore, Singapore