1st Edition

Parenting After the Century of the Child
Travelling Ideals, Institutional Negotiations and Individual Responses





ISBN 9781138260603
Published November 29, 2016 by Routledge
234 Pages

USD $62.95

Prices & shipping based on shipping country


Preview

Book Description

Bridging the gap between studies orientated around parenthood and those on the ’globalization’ of childhood, Parenting After the Century of the Child provides a timely intervention to the scholarship. It explores in depth negotiations of travelling ideals on childhood, showing the power of institutional implementations that affect parenting practices. Drawing on the latest research conducted in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and South East Asia, this book examines ideas currently travelling across the globe within institutional settings, providing new insights into the dynamics and ambivalences involved in the simultaneous reframing of childhood and parenthood. This truly global volume will appeal to anthropologists and sociologists with interests in gender, childhood studies and the sociology of the family.

Author(s)

Biography

Tatjana Thelen is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland. Haldis Haukanes is Associate Professor in the Department of Education and Health Promotion at the University of Bergen, Norway.

Reviews

'This fascinating and rich collection offers a new perspective on how conceptions and practices of good parenting are shaped in the interplay between local cultures, institutional arrangements and practices and the impact of the circulation and transfer of international models. This book shows the contested and continually socially constructed nature both of parenting and of childhood. In a globalized context, tensions and contestations may appear both more evident and more dramatic.' Chiara Saraceno, Wissenschaftszentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung, Germany 'This is a valuable contribution to understandings of parenting and childcare within families and in interactions between families and wider social and state institutions. The authors bring together insights from a wide range of cultural, historical and disciplinary perspectives in order to better understand the ways in which concepts of "good" parenting are constructed and transmitted across time and place in a globalizing world.' Rebecca Kay, University of Glasgow, UK